Publishers Weekly Digital Archive

pw3Publishers Weeklythe authoritative voice of the publishing industry in the United States (also Britain) since 1872, will soon be available in full digital format from its inception to the present. The collection will provide an historical record of the advancement of the publishing industry, with its famous mix of news, features, sales figures, and trends. Included in this trove are PW’s renowned book reviews, which began in the 1940s. The complete archive will include up to 400,000 book reviews, 5,000 author profiles/interviews, and bestseller lists from 1895 forward.

This primary source archive, to contain every page of Publishers Weekly published over its first 141 years, all in its original context, in full color, will be fully searchable “to support lines of inquiry into print media and digital culture, American studies, popular culture, history of the book, literature, history, humanities, and their many sub-disciplines” (NA Publishing). pw

While the full archive has been announced as available (and currently sits in our menu of Penn Library e-resources),  it’s actually still being rolled out with the project completion date announced for “the fourth quarter of 2016 or the first quarter of 2017.” A lot is still missing so I wonder if their estimated time frame  is not overly optimistic. Right now the only solid issue blocks are 1872-1884 and 1940-1954, and then a good sampling of material in the 2000s. (NOTE: Penn access will only include up to 2013 in this product but access to the more recent years is available in Lexis Nexis Academic, since 11/2004.)
“Providing students and scholars with access to the Publishers Weekly digital archive,” says Jeff Moyer, president of  NA Publishing, “supports a new level of research and understanding of America’s publishing industry. Every page, every article, every table and all of the advertisements will be reproduced as originally printed in full color.”  
Here’s to seeing more issues populate the platform in the next six months!  

May CommQuote

This month’s quote is brought to us by Abby Smith Rumsey‘s WE ARE NO MORE: HOW DIGITAL MEMORY IS SHAPING OUR FUTURE (Bloomsbury Press, 2016).  Notes Paul Saffo,9781620408025 Consulting Professor, Stanford University School of Engineering, “Rumsey takes us on a lucid and deeply thought-provoking journey into what makes the human species unique–the capacity to create external memory. This book will change how you think about our collective store of knowledge, and its future.”

“And so it is with our artificial memory. The more fragile the medium, the more redundancy we need. Nothing we have invented so far is as fragile as digital data. We began our attempt to cheat death by creating mighty artifacts of clay, stone, paper, and parchment that outperformed our memory by hundreds and thousands of years. Now we create storage media that maximize volume, not durability. The Sumerian scribes looking down on us from their imaginary perch in space-time would be surprised at how far we have gotten in documenting the world and its many transactions over time, how far beyond accounting, epics, and prayers we have extended the memory of humanity, and how many people can read, write, and circulate their ideas across the globe instantaneously. They would marvel at the trade-offs we so lightly make between volume and durability. But we may not have to make such trade-offs forever. We are entering now into an experiment with memory that was not even imaginable until a few decades ago–to take the first, most compact, and most enduring form of memory, the DNA molecule, and encode it with digital data…” –p. 162

LGBTQ Video Game Archive

It is my great pleasure to introduce LGBTQ Video Game Archive, a cool new resource on the scene as just tweeted yesterday by Adrienne Shaw @adrishaw: “Still a work in progress, but the first half of my digital archive of LGBTQ content in games is open to the public.” Ta-da!

Juhani_Force_persuade-620x352Dr. Shaw (Gr’10), is Assistant Professor at Temple University’s Department of Media Studies and Production and author of Gaming at the Edge: Sexuality and Gender at the Margins of Gamer Culture. She describes the archive as a “curated collection of information about LGBTQ and queerly read game content.” The archive is organized around lists of games by decade, characters, locations, actions, mentions, and themes such as Homophobia/Transphobia, to name a few. All categories are clearly defined so there’s no confusion (ex. “Mods: Game modifications (mods) are player-made additions to games that alters the visuals or operation of a game. In this archive that includes mods that allow for same-sex relationships, change gender presentation options, or enable other LGBTQ content”).

The site also includes a bibliography, an “ongoing collection of academic writing about LGBTQ video game content, designers, players, or related topics.” All over the site you will find invitations for any and all feedback–questions, suggestions for additions and corrections. Indeed, the description of whole enterprise in the About section leads with “A work in progress and a labor of love.” It will be fun to watch it grow!

 

Introducing Black Quotidian

AmsterdamnewsAn exciting new digital history project, Black Quotidian: Everyday History in African-American Newspapers,” is being launched by Matt Delmont. Made possible by Proquest’s Black Newspapers collection, Delmont plans to post at least one newspaper article daily from that date in history with a brief accompanying commentary.  The project commences on Martin Luther King Day 2016, and the entry for that is already posted (as of 1/4/2016).  The post includes four articles published on January 18, 1969 from the Philadelphia Tribune, the Pittsburgh Courier, and the New York Amsterdam News. Explains the curator, Black Quotidian “is designed to highlight everyday moments and lives in African-American history…By emphasizing the ordinary or mundane aspects of history I hope both to call attention to people and events that are not commonly featured in textbooks, documentaries, or Black History Month celebrations, while also casting new light on well-known black history subjects.” His hope is to not be the only curator of the site and invites others to contribute.  No stranger to creating culturally rich websites, there’s  The Nicest Kids in Town digital project, that accompanies his book on American Bandstand and  Why Busing Failed  built to accompany his book of the same title (Why Busing Failed: Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregation).

Newspaper Map

mapThere’s a new way to read electronic facsimiles of current newspapers from around the world other than through Library PressDisplay (NewspaperDirect), a Penn Libraries e-resource.  If the paper you are looking for is not in the PressDisplay, try Newspaper Map which purportedly displays over 10,000 newspapers on one Google Map.  Navigating the map, it may be tricky locating the paper you want from areas of dense marker population. Luckily you can use the search boxes to locate titles by place and name; that’s usually the easier path. What makes this resource really useful is each title is linked with translation options (though it doesn’t always deliver I discovered). Give it a try.  It’s fun reading even (or especially) without a research agenda. 

New Propaganda and Activism Collections from Archives Unbound

Students and researchers working in the areas of media activism and propaganda studies may want to check out these recent additions to the Penn Libraries website. They all conveniently live on the Archives Unbound platform, a growing digital repository of topically-focused primary source material gathered to support the research needs of scholars and students.

New activism archives:

Politics, Social Activism and Community Support: Selected Gay and Lesbian Periodicals and Newsletters archives unbound
This collection of periodicals focuses on newsletters issued by gay and lesbian political and social activist organizations throughout the country and on periodicals devoted to gay and lesbian political and social activist agendas.

Black Liberation Army and the Program of Armed Struggle
Sourced from the Federal Bureau of Investigation Library, this collection consists of a wide range of materials, including FBI surveillance and informant reports and correspondence from a variety of offices including, New York City, Baltimore, New Haven, San Francisco, Detroit, Miami, Atlanta, Newark, Kansas City, and Cleveland; intercepted correspondence; Justice Department memoranda, correspondence and analyses; news clippings and articles; and more.

Ralph J. Bunche Oral Histories Collection on the Civil Rights Movement
This collection from the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center contains transcriptions of close to 700 interviews with those who made history in the struggles for voting rights, against discrimination in housing, for the desegregation of the schools, to expose racism in hiring, in defiance of police brutality, and to address poverty in the African American communities

Rastafari Ephemeral Publications From The Written Rastafari Archives Project
The Written Rastafari Archives Project (WRAP) involves an exclusive collection of the most well-known Rastafari ephemerals – newsletters, magazines, newspapers, booklets, statements, letters, articles and assorted literature—written and published by a number of Rastafari Mansions, organizations, groups and individuals over the past four decades.

 New Propaganda archives:

Psychological Warfare and Propaganda in World War II: Air Dropped and Shelled Leaflets and Periodicals
Rare leaflets, pamphlets and periodicals created and disseminated by the Allied Forces during World War II.

German Anti-Semitic Propaganda, 1909-1941
This collection comprises approximately 200 books and pamphlets; many directly connected with Nazi groups from the 1920s and 1930s.

While I was preparing this post on new acquisitions I noticed some other files in this resources that would also contribute to good communication history projects:

“Through the Camera Lens:” The Moving Picture World and the Silent Cinema Era, 1907-1927

Electing the President: Proceedings of the Democratic National Conventions, 1832-1988

Electing the President: Proceedings of the Republican National Conventions, 1856-1988

Hollywood, Moral Censorship, and the Motion Picture Production Code, 1927-1968

Japanese-American Relocation Camp Newspapers: Perspectives on Day-to-Day Life

The Archives Unbound search engine allows one to query across collections which, of course, becomes of greater value as we subscribe to more files.