Book feature: Global Journalism Research: Theories, Methods, Findings, Future

Drawing on a rich range of research from around the world–Asia, Africa, Eastern and Western Europe, and North and South America–Global Journalism Research: Theories, Methods, Findings, Future (Blackwell, 2008), charts the major theoretical and methodological perspectives contributing to the globally interconnected field of journalism. Edited by Martin Loffelholz and David Weaver, who outline the history of journalism research in their introduction, the volume is girded by leading figures working in the field today (including our own Raymond Williams Professor of Communication, Barbie Zelizer) and should serve as an essential touchstone for students venturing into this important area of research.

Part I: Introduction to Journalism Research
1. Questioning National, Cultural and Disciplinary Boundaries: A Call for Global Journalism Research: David Weaver (Indiana University, Bloomington) and Martin Löffelholz (Ilmenau University of Technology, Germany)
Part II: Theories of Journalism Research
2. Heterogeneous – Multi-dimensional – Competing: Theoretical Approaches on Journalism – an Overview: Martin Löffelholz (Ilmenau University of Technology)
3. Journalism in a Globalizing World Society: A Societal Approach to Journalism Research: Manfred Rühl (University of Bamberg)
4. Journalism as a Human Right: The Cultural Approach to Journalism: John Hartley (Queensland University of Technology)
5. The Structure of News Production: The Organizational Approach to Journalism Research: Klaus-Dieter Altmeppen (Ilmenau University of Technology)
6. Factors Behind Journalists’ Professional Behavior: A Psychological Approach to Journalism Research: Wolfgang Donsbach (Dresden University, Germany)
7. Jounalism as a Symbolic Practice – The Gender Approach in Journalism Research: Gertrude J. Robinson (McGill University, Montreal)
Part III: Methodology and Methods of Journalism Research
8. Comparing Journalism across Cultural Boundaries: State-of-the-art, Strategies, Problems, and Solutions: Thomas Hanitzsch (University of Zürich)
9. Methods of Journalism Research – Survey: David Weaver (Indiana University)
10. Methods of Journalism Research – Content Analysis: Christian Kolmer (Media Tenor Institute, Bonn)
11. Methods of Journalism Research: Observation: Thorsten Quandt (Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany)
Part IV: Selected Paradigms and Findings of Journalism Research
12. Journalism Research in the United States: Paradigm Shift in Times of Globalization: Jane B. Singer (University of Iowa)
13. Journalism Research in Germany: Evolution and Central Research Interests: Siegfried Weischenberg (Hamburg University, Germany) and Maja Malik (University of Münster, Germany)
14. Journalism Research in the UK: From Isolated Efforts to an Established Discipline: Karin Wahl-Jorgensen and Bob Franklin
15. South African Journalism Research: Challenging Paradigmatic Schisms and Finding a Foothold in an Era of Globalization: Arnold S. de Beer (Stellenbosch University, South Africa)
16. Journalism Research in Greater China: Its Communities, Approaches, and Themes: Joseph Man Chan (University of Hong Kong), Ven-hwei Lo (National Chengchi University, Taiwan), and Zhongdang Pan (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
17. Journalism Research in Mexico: Historical Development and Research Interests in the Latin American Context: María Elena Hernández Ramírez (University of Guadalajara) and Andreas Schwarz (Ilmenau University of Technology)
Part V: The Future of Journalism Research
18. Re-Considering “Journalism” for Journalism Research: Ari Heinonen (University of Tampere, Finland) and Heikki Luostarinen (University of Tampere, Finland)
19. Theorizing a Globalized Journalism: Stephen D. Reese (University of Texas at Austin)
20. Going Beyond Disciplinary Boundaries in the Future of Journalism Research: Barbie Zelizer (University of Pennsylvania)
21. Journalism Education in an Era of Globalization: Mark Deuze (Indiana University)
Part VI: Conclusions
22. Journalism Research: Summing Up and Looking Ahead: Martin Löffelholz (Ilmenau University of Technology, Germany) and David Weaver (Indiana University)

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